Corning Museum Field Trip

Students learn about the pyroceramic material discovered by accident in the 1950s and now found commonly in the household kitchen as CorningWare® bakeware
Students learn about the pyroceramic material discovered by accident in the 1950s and now found commonly in the household kitchen as CorningWare bakeware

Recently, members of the South Williamsport Area ACS High School Chemistry Club, along with current & former chemistry students, traveled to theCorning Museum of Glass in Corning, NY. The trip was part of a field trip sponsored by the First Community Foundation Partnership of Pennsylvania and the school district’s Parent Teacher Organization. As a pre-requisite to attending the field trip, students were required to investigate and report on topics/techniques related to glass working and glass chemistry. This included the production of Pyrex and Gorilla Glass, the coloring of glass using various metal ions and artistic techniques used to create “ice glass”. Continue reading “Corning Museum Field Trip”

Chemistry Apps for Students

ChemClub can be a great opportunity for some informal learning about basic chemistry concepts, but they have to be fun, engaging and appropriate.

A recent ACS Newsletter featured an article that offered 24 free chemistry apps for iPads that are appropriate for chemistry students. The list was compiled by Christopher Pappas of elearningindustry.com and it includes a wide range of subject matter and levels.  While some are more appropriate for a university level, there are many that high school chem students will enjoy.


Atom Builder Screen Shot

 

For example there is Atom-Builder, a game designed to teach students the skills they need to count protons, neutrons, and electrons in an atom. In another app called Chemistry Formulas Practice, students learn the skill of naming compounds and writing formulas.

 

 


Nova Elements Screenshot

One of my personal favorites is NOVA Elements.  This is part of the educational support materials that were developed for the two-hour NOVA program, “Hunting the Elements.” Using this app you can explore and interactive periodic table, play a game with the host of the Nova program or watch “Hunting the Elements”.  ACS worked with NOVA in the development of some of the support materials for the show.


Beyond the apps listed in the ACS Newsletter, there are a number of interesting items for both iOS and Android based platforms.


Elements 4D

A new app called Elements 4D is amazing.  Technology often amazes me, but doesn’t often surprise me.  Elements 4D did both.  Print out paper cubes and fold them into shape.  Each face is printed with an element name, at. no. and at. wt.  But when you hold the paper cube in front of the smart device camera, it changes into a transparent cube with a representation of the element inside! There is also basic information about the element in text below the image.  Take two cubes and hold them together in front of the camera and if they can react, they will, and the programs shows the product. Making the paper cubes would be a great club activity.


A search for Chemistry Apps on Google Play generated a dozen hits.  Among these was Chemistry Helper, which the site describes as “A simple app designed as a quick reference for chemistry students. Includes a periodic table with links to wikipedia, a tool to calculate molecular masses of compounds (with a button at the top to perform simple grams/moles calculations, calculate mass percents and do stoichiometry.” Plus lots of other functions.


Complete Chemistry

 

 

 

Complete Chemistry includes tutorials, problem solvers, quizzes, formulas and a chemical dictionary.  It received great reviews as an effective tool to help students learn chemistry.

 

 

 


ChemPro: Chemistry Tutor is aimed at AP Students or General Chem students.  It is linked to video lessons and has an array of flash cards to help student learn important basic information.  Students can try various experiments with no danger of broken test tubes or expensive reagents.


Virtual lab

 

And finally, there is Chemist: Virtual Chem Lab, which (for $4.99) allows you to do a variety of virtual experiments on your smart tablet. Students can try various experiments with no danger of broken test tubes or expensive reagents.

 

 

Students seem to be drawn to technology, especially when it is fun and interesting.  Check out these apps to see if they might have a place in your next ChemClub activity.

What are your favorite apps to use?